RelyOn Technologies Introduces Website

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RelyOn Technologies is expanding its reach with a brand new website.

According to a release, RelyOn Technologies offers the full line of industrial spray booths designed and manufactured by Garmat USA in its Englewood, Colo.-facility. These include booths of any size from the smallest to the extra large, big enough to spray paint rocket ships and airplane parts and sections.

Together, these two companies are able to meet any budget requirements, any production needs and custom design systems capable of working perfectly in any factory space layout. Fully licensed for all aspects of construction, thereby avoiding the need to utilize any outside contractors, RelyOn can provide a turn-key installation. Everything is geared to the highest quality standards possible, all designed to streamline operational efficiency to produce the maximum possible return on investment.

While most may think of a spray paint booth in the traditional sense of spray-painting automobiles, the products offered by RelyOn and Garmat go well beyond these.

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Industrial booths are used for woodworking, as in the manufacture of furniture, doors, shutters, etc. They are also called for when working with certain composites such as metal alloys, carbon fiber and fiberglass materials.

All booths feature full downdraft, semi-downdraft, side-draft or cross flow ventilation, comply with all associated government regulations, state and local, and can be custom designed to meet whatever specifications are required for each individual job.

For companies in the automobile collision repair business, having a long-lasting, spray paint booth that is designed to use a minimum of shop space and maximize revenue by increasing productivity is essential. Drive through doors, vehicle lifts and make-up air that can be heated or cooled make these booths the number one choice.

Buying advice for basket bats

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Let us face the facts: baseball bats are some of the most complex objects in sports. It looks simple but it is meticulously designed to ensure that it can allow quick and balanced swings while at the same time providing power that is required to hit the ball once it is thrown by the pitcher in a baseball game. It is mainly divided into the barrel, handle, and the knob, all of which are carefully designed to perform various functions.

Baseball player with bat. Studio shot over white.

According to the baseball regulations, the thickest part of a baseball bat should not be more than 2.75 inches in diameter and its length should not exceed 42 inches long. The bat should be made of wood or metal alloys. However, if it is made of aluminum for instance, it has to be a Batted Ball Coefficient of Restitution for it to be used in a game, according to the law.

Most baseball bats used in college and most baseball leagues are made of aluminum, but professional baseball players prefer wood baseball bats because of the traditional look and the feel. The cracking sound made when a wooden baseball bat hits the ball is considered to be more pleasing to the ear than the “ping” sound made when an aluminum bat hits the ball. However, wooden baseball bats break easily. On the other side of the coin, a ball hit with an aluminum bat goes at a higher speed than another hit with a wooden bat. Aluminum bats are lighter than the wooden ones and a higher distance can be covered using less effort. Overall, both wooden and metal-alloy baseball bats have their own advantages and disadvantages. The choice normally depends on the level of play, the regulations and the personal preference.

Buying advice for basket bats

Before buying a basket bat, it is advisable to have a keen look at the baseball bat reviews available so that you can have a sneak peak of how a good baseball bat should be. These reviews are available in various baseball online shops or review websites. It is also important to research and familiarize yourself with the practical details of baseball bats before you buy one. You cannot avoid the legal issues for instance. At these times when financial crises do not cease to rock the world economy, a baseball bat should not cost an arm or a leg. However, low price does not mean that you should compromise the quality or the ‘feel’ of the bat. A surefire way of avoiding fake bats is buying from a reputable baseball equipment dealer. Whether you buy a wooden or an aluminum bat is up, to you, as this is essentially a matter of personal preference.

Indeed, whether you are a professional baseball player or an amateur, what matters is what kind of a baseball bat you will use. To ensure that you use the right bat, check online for baseball bat reviews from various users, and make an informed decision based on the reviews.

Wagner Brand Paint Sprayers

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If you want to buy a paint sprayer then you can buy it from the Wagner because Wagner is a trust brand. In the market you can find all of the products of the Wagner brand. You can use the Wagner products for home improvement, industrial and commercial painting and if you want to finish your painting with a good result then you can use Wagner brand paint sprayers.

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The Wagner Company helps the customers to prepare the surfaces easy and apply for a good paint. It also helps you to cleanup right when you finish your painting work. Actually this company made all the products that really wanted by the customers.

If you want to buy and product of Wagner band please look at this article before buying the product because I am sure that this article will help you to get an idea about the product of Wagner brand. After reading this article when you get a good idea about the product of Wagner brand then you can buy the best one for you.

Products of the Wagner brand:

There are many kinds of the product of the Wagner brand available in the market like Wagner 0518080 control spray max high volume low pressure (HVLP) Sprayer, Wagner 0529010 indoor or outdoor handheld sprayer kid that can be used both in indoor or outdoor and many more product. Most of the people generally use these two sprayers for their paint work. Let’s see the work of these sprayers.

Wagner 0518080 Sprayer max high volume low pressure (HVLP):

  • You can use this sprayer in many work like you can use this sprayer for your cabinet paint and also you can use this sprayer for your furniture painting work.
  • In this pressure you can get high volume but low pressure facilities which will be good for your paint work.
  • This paint sprayer weight will be not too much and for this reason you can carry with you very easily and can work in a better mode and you can get a better performance.
  • There are some powerful materials inside this paint sprayer and for this reasons this paint sprayer will be friends of yours for do your work with an excellent performance.
  • If you want to get a good paint in your house and in your furniture’s you can use this paint sprayer. You can use it in any kinds of home improvement works.
  • When you want to finish your work from it then it will get you a good finish. Also there are many kinds of facilities in this paint sprayer for this reason you can use this paint sprayer.

Wagner 0529010 indoor or outdoor handheld kit paint sprayer:

  • You can use this paint sprayer for both outdoor and indoor work and it can help you in many ways.
  • It is mainly an airless paint sprayer and you know that an airless paint sprayer can be very helpful for you.
  • From this paint sprayer you can spray your interior surface easily.
  • The materials in this paint sprayer are most powerful than a HVPL paint sprayer and for this reason you can use this paint sprayer.

First time buyer

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What do you look for when you buy or are looking to buy your first bass guitar? Should it be new and possibly expensive? Used and possibly cheap? Is the bass in question the one your favourite musician uses? Did you read about a particular model or did somebody recommend one? What about buying online at eBay or Craigslist, through the Buy & Sell or at a pawnshop? Small local store or generic music store chain? Four strings or twelve?

This issue’s article is a two-parter … I think it’s very important to talk about the many options and situations which can affect your decision making process; especially if you are new to the world of bass guitar.

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Here are some things to consider:

1) Price Range.

What do you want to spend or better yet what is your budget? Most musicians are balancing on fairly unstable financial ground, so be aware of what you are prepared to shell out. I’m a fan of making sure the money is in place (if possible) to get whatever it is that I’m looking for. That way the deal is over and done with at the beginning. Unfortunately, this scenario is the less common one to most of us working folk. This is where buying at a bigger music store can come into play. If your credit rating is okay, you can set up a payment plan and with minimal money down walk out of your local Long & McQuade or Steve’s Music, etc., with your bass in hand. There will be interest added onto the overall purchase price just like any other payment plan and you will pay more in the end. Top of the line basses cost top of the line dollars so you might want to consider the compromise of getting a bass that is reasonably priced. It might not be your first choice but if you are in it for the long haul you’ll eventually end up with the one or the ones you’ve always wanted.

2) Model and Brand.

I have pretty small hands. Some basses are not very comfortable to play as a result. Try out a few different kinds of basses, different brands, different shapes and different sizes. You want to get a feel, a sense of what might be right or wrong for your situation. What is it like when you play it sitting or standing? Is it light or heavy? Does it feel good playing with a pick and with your fingers? Is the neck size a regular scale, short scale or long scale? Does it feel balanced when you’re wearing it with a strap? The main thing is to look around as much as possible. And never be afraid to ask questions. Any questions?

3) What Kinds of Music Are You Interested in Playing?

Some instruments lend themselves naturally to certain kinds of music. If you are in a hard rock band you probably want to get something that will give you the necessary crunch and heaviness, which is part of the music like a Gibson Thunderbird. If you like a lot of mid-range punch you may want to check out a Music Man Stingray. If you like jazz, a fretless bass may be in order or an upright.

4) Bring Someone Who Knows

I started out playing a copy of a Jazz bass when I was 13. It was a decent, well made beginner bass, which didn’t cost an arm and a leg to acquire. My bass teacher, Wayne Boychuck, helped me pick it out. Actually, he sorted it out completely as I had no prior experience in the buying or selling of any sort of instrument. It was a definite plus to have someone give me guidance so I wouldn’t get ripped off when it came time to actually hand my money over for my new purchase. It’s not just little kids who get burned either. A contemporary of mine wanted to get an effects pedal for his burgeoning pedal board setup. He hadn’t bought many before so I offered to help him out, to come along to the music shop so he could find something solid and workable at the best price possible. I was out on the road with Sarah McLachlan for a while and he didn’t want to wait. What happened was he ended up going to a local music shop and got talked into buying a pedal which cost way too much that wasn’t all that suitable to his needs. This pedal now sits around gathering dust. It really does pay to have someone with you who knows about gear and stuff–especially if it’s your first time buying a bass.

Brian Minato is the bassist for Sarah McLachlan. He is also a Vancouver based musician/producer currently working with The Blue Alarm, Boywonderbread, Sandy Scofield, Jennifer Campbell, Chris Tait and other artists. Find him online at www.thebluealarm.com, www.myspace.com/thebluealarm.

The Adman in the Parlor: Magazines and the Gendering of Consumer Culture, 1880s-1910s

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Don’t sweep the old way!” an 1896 advertisement in the Ladies’ Home Journal admonishes. “The New Woman Sweeps… with a Superette.” In the Ladies’ Home Journal of 1910, Old Dutch Cleanser claimed to be “A Champion of Women’s Rights,” including the right to “freedom from household drudgery” and “the right to spotless floors…without the penalty…of an aching back.” The Western Electric Company promised in 1914 to “revolutionize” women’s life and work, announcing that their Sturlevant vacuum cleaner was a prime mover in the creation of “Woman in Her Newer Sphere.”

298636229If this sounds familiar, it is. Virginia Slims trumpets “You’ve Come a Long Way, Baby”; Charlie perfume’s career woman is “…Kinda Now, Kinda Free, Kinda Wow!”; Liz Claiborne proclaims that women’s “Possibilities Are Endless.” For over a century, American advertisers have appropriated political impulses to sell household products, reducing women’s liberation to a set of consumer choices. Conflating purchasing power with political power, advertisers still sell to women by convincing them that marketplace options are the same thing as political empowerment, and that smart shopping makes women the informed citizens on whom national progress depends.

In The Adman in the Parlor Ellen Garvey looks back at the origins of this and other gendered sales strategies – at the moment of the emergence of consumer society itself. In spite of its title, the book is really about the structuring of a personal and political relationship between women readers and magazine advertising, not about magazines as a whole. Working episodically, Garvey spotlights only selected moments of interplay, but she chooses some of the most relevant moves in a complex dance.

In its reference to the “New Woman” of the 1890s, for example, the Superette ad “aligns the product with exciting new political possibilities, even as it reduces suffragette to sweeperette.” While such ads interjected political images and awareness, they also “trivialized a serious quest for political power into a choice of trimmings and appliances suggested.” Garvey explores how the mass marketplace became the arena of women’s political and personal expression, creating a gender ideology in which consumer choices were identified as the only real “vote” American women should want.

But why would the better-educated, more liberated “New Woman” of the 1890s elect to make the same old choices? How did the march of progress lead middle-class women down the department store aisle? What enticed so many smart women to buy into such a bad deal?

Garvey avoids the stereotypes of “woman as victim” and “woman as complicit in her own oppression.” She depicts women as active and creative enough to invent themselves and thus “invest themselves deeply” in an identity as consumers; yet she also argues that they were passive and naive enough to be coopted by advertisers’ PR about women’s inalienable right to consume. She sees magazines and advertisers working in tandem to promote women’s engagement with advertising narratives and images, all the While diverting their attention from the real aim – product sales.

Advertising parlor games and ad-writing contests, for example, which invited magazine readers to write stories and poems using advertising slogans or phrases, encouraged women to embrace consumption as something other than it was. The games emphasized textual play and parlor display, creating “a mythology separate from any experience with the products.”

Garvey also analyzes sixty trade card scrapbooks, made by women from the “calling cards” that advertisers gave away as promotionals for their products. Not only did these cards present the advertiser “as a social caller,” they encouraged women to view ads as “aesthetic objects” and themselves as “judges and decision-makers,” associating advertising and purchasing with pleasure, self-expression and power. Taken together, scrapbooks and ad contests helped magazine-reading women to become both active seekers and unwitting suckers of the consumption ethic.

The effort paid off handsomely for the advertisers, as many brand names became synonyms for products. Trademark law assisted in this process by protecting only those words capable of syntactically replacing a generic term, such as Kodak for camera, or Kleenex for tissue. “The new vocabulary of brand names replaced the generic or descriptive words for products,” Garvey notes; they became a kind of “cultural shorthand in an increasingly heterogeneous nation.” Like progressive politics, advertising offered, on some level, to dissolve divisions and unify Americans. Of course, the equation of the particular with the generic delighted advertisers and promised a kind of common knowledge, but it also threatened the integrity of individualism and authenticity – qualities with deep resonance in American culture.

Magazine stories worked with advertising to resolve this conflict between mass production and individual irreplaceability. Product brands ranging from Pears’ soap to Cottolene shortening showed up in pivotal roles, particularly in magazine romances, thus endearing some brands to women’s hearts. Like today’s advertorials, these stories plugged products by making them solutions to the very dilemmas the narratives posed. Mass-produced products brought out individual, incomparable graces at key moments in an imminent amour. Clinching a one-and-only love, these product placements vanquished anxieties about massification while breeding intimacy with women and deep brand loyalties.

But that was fiction. In reality, the idiom of brand names became a mark of distinction between social classes and genders. Elite magazines like Harpers typically mocked brand-name references for their too-easy virtue among the mixed and growing masses of America, dismissing overt commercialism as a mark of “low culture.” And women’s “fine discrimination” and “careful choosing,” which earlier had qualified them as the rightful arbiters of family consumption, was soon maligned by male producers as typical feminine capriciousness.

As Garvey explains, “anxious male advertisers and ad writers [resented] courting women who [could] hold men’s fate in their hands.” This male anxiety-cum-anger recalls Ann Douglas’ analysis of the attitudes of male novelists toward the predominantly female audiences of the 1850s in The Feminization of American Culture (Knopf, 1977); it suggests once again that even the delimited self-expression and mediated public power allotted to women through their purchasing preferences raised an unintended and unwelcome challenge to male ambition and marketplace control.

The adman in the parlor makes substantial contributions to both gender and popular culture studies. Yet Garvey seems to ignore the most central site of her argument – the women’s magazine itself. From the Ladies Magazine and Repository in 1792 to Glamour or Redbook today, the women’s magazine remains a complex and multivocal arena in which interests and voices both cooperate and compete. From the late eighteenth century to Glamour and Cosmopolitan, the US women’s magazine has operated as a kind of forum. Between its covers, multiple departments and multiple voices – letters, articles, short stories, serials, poetry, advice columns, arts reviews, illustrations and advertising – have always worked both with and against each other. Although constrained by gender politics, commercial interests and the social class assumptions they both reflect and help configure, the women’s magazine remains a miscellaneous and less than stable genre. Its discrepant voices make it inherently open to competing meanings and interpretations.

Take this August’s Glamour, for example. An article questioning the efficacy of the new generation of diet pills on page 42 contrasts with the super-slim women of its own “Beauty Watch” on page 86, as well as its ads. On page 110 a personal story denouncing racism in America sits beside an advertisement for women’s lingerie that, styled like a women’s magazine cover, pictures a bleach-blonde model so lily-white as to accentuate the Caucasian standards of mainstream advertising, the women’s magazine and American society itself. Even the modern mass-market women’s magazine, with all its sophisticated market research, remains resistant to the uniformity of intent and outcome that Garvey attributes to the genre at the turn of the century – when the mass-market women’s magazine was young, and the advertising industry and the national marketplace were just getting organized.

Garvey so misses the impact of the women’s magazine in its own right that she often speaks of it in the passive voice. And she often drops in claims about magazines that are loaded with debatable assumptions – such as the easy assertion that “editorial content followed advertising,” or the simplistic generalization embedded in a phrase like “within the discourse of the magazine as a whole…”

The mass-market magazines Garvey analyzes were neither so transparent nor so single-mindedly the helpmates of advertising as she suggests – or even as some of their editors and publishers may have wanted. Turn-of-the-century women’s magazines were variously enmeshed in complicated, and highly gendered, forces of commercialization, some of which only indirectly related to advertisers. They faced intense competition in a maturing market. Even industry leaders struggled to satisfy increasingly worldly “New Woman” readers.

For example, Edward Bok of the Ladies’ Home Journal (one of Garvey’s favorite sources) at times bowed to reader pressure with regard to editorial content, even when it conflicted with his own staunchly conservative gender politics. Bok launched regular “Breadwinner” and “Dressing for Business” columns at the turn of the century in response to demographics and reader demands, publishing this politically progressive copy alongside his own editorial exaltations of domesticity. This content did not “follow from advertising”; neither did it conform to the notion of one single perspective that Garvey suggests unified the magazine “as a whole.” Other top women’s magazines of the era, including Delineator (1873-1937), Woman’s Home Companion (1874-1957) and even Good Housekeeping (1885-present), also quickly established wage-earning columns, lest they be surpassed in popularity and the era’s all-important “up-to-date-ness” by the Journal or other rivals. These pressures within and among mass-market women’s magazines at the time shaped editorial choices and voices, in turn constructing gender politics and consumption practices, and they related to the interests of advertisers obliquely at best.

Had Garvey enriched her analysis with a nuanced view of the women’s magazine, her wonderfully roving eye and multiple strands of argument might have yielded a more fluid and convincing overall discussion. And a firmer grasp of the role of the magazine might have enabled her to contour her “middle-class women readers,” rather than merely addressing them as an abstract category. Mass-market women’s magazines at the turn of the century competed with each other, but as a group they did also work collectively; both their differences and resemblances helped to redefine women’s middle-classness to suit the expanding national market. Garvey diffuses an opportunity to delineate the terms of these shifts in gender identity – terms which have informed both modern feminism and contemporary debates about the cultural status of consumption in America.

Still, The Adman in the Parlor is a creative look at the engendering of US consumerism, and it advances needed, novel approaches to the analysis of the mass marketplace. Ellen Garvey opens up new angles on the making and marketing of a gender politics that promised American women the world, but gave them only the store.

AMY ARONSON recently completed her doctorate in American literature and culture at Columbia University, where her dissertation was a cultural history of the early American women’s magazine. She has taught courses on gender and racial representation in the Department of Journalism and Media Studies at Rutgers University and at The New School for Social Research.